Category Archives: Big Pharma

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Who Loves Bitcoin?

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 Bitcoin

Bitcoin

With the Bitcoin price so volatile everyone is curious. Bitcoin, the category creator of blockchain technology, is the World Wide Ledger yet extremely complicated and no one definition fully encapsulates it. By analogy it is like being able to send a gold coin via email. It is a consensus network that enables a new payment system and a completely digital money.

It is the first decentralized peer-to-peer payment network that is powered by its users with no central authority or middlemen. Bitcoin was the first practical implementation and is currently the most prominent triple entry bookkeeping system in existence.

Who created Bitcoin?

The first Bitcoin specification and proof of concept was published in 2009 by an unknown individual under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto who revealed little about himself and left the project in late 2010. The Bitcoin community has since grown exponentially.

Satoshi’s anonymity often raises unjustified concerns because of a misunderstanding of Bitcoin’s open-source nature. Everyone has access to all of the source code all of the time and any developer can review or modify the software code. As such, the identity of Bitcoin’s inventor is probably as relevant today as the identity of the person who invented paper.

Who is involved in Bitcoin?

Over $1B of investment into Bitcoin and blockchain companies has taken place resulting in thousands of companies and hundreds of thousands of individuals involved from around the world.

Who controls the Bitcoin network?

Nobody owns the  network much like no one owns the technology behind email or the Internet.  Transactions are verified by Bitcoin miners which has an entire industry and Bitcoin cloud mining options. While developers are improving the software they cannot force a change in the Bitcoin protocol because all users are free to choose what software and version they use.

In order to stay compatible with each other, all users need to use software complying with the same rules.  Crypto currencies can only work correctly with a complete consensus among all users. Therefore, all users and developers have a strong incentive to protect this consensus.

How does Bitcoin work?

From a user perspective, crypto currencies  is nothing more than a mobile app or computer program that provides a personal Bitcoin wallet and enables a user to send and receive bitcoins.

Behind the scenes, the  network is sharing a massive public ledger called the “block chain”. This ledger contains every transaction ever processed which enables a user’s computer to verify the validity of each transaction. The authenticity of each transaction is protected by digital signatures corresponding to the sending addresses therefore allowing all users to have full control over sending bitcoins.

Thus, there is no fraud, no chargebacks and no identifying information that could be compromised resulting in identity theft. To learn more about Blockchain, you can consult the original Bitcoin whitepaper, read through the extremely thorough Frequently Asked Questions, listen to a Bitcoin podcast or read the latest Bitcoin news.

 

 

Big Pharma Current Events Junk Food Uncategorized USDA

USDA Traded One Disease For Another

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wheat-field-1400x500In the late 1970s, a senate committee pushed its “Dietary Goals for the United States” urging Americans to eat less fat. It was thought that red meat, eggs, and dairy were killing Americans.

By the 1980s, nearly a million Americans were dying of heart disease each year.

Again, Americans were told to eat less fat and eat more carbohydrates. These recommendations were built into a monument and lauded to the public as the salvation for American health: The Food Pyramid.

The Food Pyramid recommended carbohydrates as the staple of a healthy diet. Fat was a killer, or so we were led to believe, therefore recommendations for fat intake were drastically reduced. A $150 million dollar study, which pushed the same message, came fast on the heels of these recommendations. The study said to eat less fat and avoid foods high in cholesterol in order to reduce your risk of heart disease.

Americans followed this advice and carbohydrate consumption rose. Not produce consumption, we increased consumption of grains and sugar. Americans are now sicker than before. Deaths from heart disease have dropped a bit, but obesity and diabetes is on the rise.

Whole milk has been banned from most of our public schools, but strawberry milk, chocolate milk, and soda machines are usually available. Whole plain yogurt is usually difficult to find in a grocery store, but low fat, sugar filled, artificially flavored, artificially colored options are everywhere. The prevailing belief is that these low fat options are healthier, even when loaded with sweeteners, than whole milk.

Deaths from heart disease have indeed slightly declined, but its close cousin, cardiovascular disease, remains the nation’s number # 1 killer and the leading cause of death for individuals with diabetes. According to Time Magazine, diabetes has increased 166% from 1980 to 2012. The low-fat trend was directed toward lowering cholesterol. Today the high fructose corn syrup found in nearly every processed food is the reason cholesterol remains high.

American Health is on a Downward Trend

In every measurable way, Americans are in worse health than ever before. It is widely predicted that our lifespan is shortening; the generations that came before us will outlive us, and we are likely to outlive the generations who succeed us.

Despite the variety of diets, popular and obscure, safe and dangerous, on average, Americans are fatter than ever before. Most Americans eat slightly less red meat and eat more lean meat, but they eat more sugar and more highly processed and refined foods. The CDC predicts that by 2030 up to 42% of the U.S. population will be obese, and 11% will be severely obese.

Over time, some foods have gone up in demand, while others have fallen in popularity. Sugar consumption from sugar cane has dropped 35% while corn-based sweeteners (mostly high fructose corn syrup) consumption has risen by 8,853%. It’s not that Americans choose to eat corn syrup, they choose to eat processed foods, and high fructose corn syrup is added to nearly every processed food.

The current government guidelines are only a little different than the original food pyramid. The current recommendations are still high in grains, but the recommendation for fruits and vegetables is higher.

Conclusion

A truly healthy diet is a diverse, whole food, plant based diet. A full 80% of your diet should consist of raw, fresh, organic produce – more vegetables than fruits. Meats should be organic. Nuts and seeds should be soaked or sprouted. Grains should be limited and gluten should be avoided if any illness is present. Dairy should be organic and raw or limited. Omega 3 fatty acids from flax seed oil, fish oil, or a blended oil and oily fish should be added to your diet.

You should avoid all artificial flavors, colors, and preservatives; MSG; high fructose corn syrup; and GMOs. Seriously limit or eliminate all processed sugar.

For more information about a truly healthy diet, read the 80% Raw Food Diet. Boost your nutrition with increased vitamins, minerals, and nutrients, learn how to make your own Total Nutrition Powder.

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Big Pharma Blood Pressure Current Events Junk Food sugar Uncategorized

Sugar And Blood Pressure ?

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untitledThe relationship between sugar and blood pressure may be more important than most people with high blood pressure even realize.

While there are so many factors that contribute to high blood pressure, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and high sodium, it seems sugar has been among the enemy ranks and can possibly do even more damage than most of us realized.

When doctors make recommendations to patients with hypertension, they often suggest a lower daily consumption of sodium and harmful fats, but sugar is less often linked to high blood pressure.

In fact, a diet known as the DASH diet is commonly recommended to those with high blood pressure. And while the DASH diet is low in fat and sodium, it’s also low in sugar — for a good reason.

Like Sodium, Sugar is Often Hidden in the Foods we Eat

It’s sweet, but it’s sneaky. Sweetener, especially high fructose corn syrup, is found even in seemingly “innocent” food products like ketchup or salad dressing without most people even realizing it’s there.

Many people also forget alcohol contains quite a bit of sugar on its own, not to mention those mixed drinks that are so popular.

Research shows those who consume more than 74 grams of hidden sugar daily are more likely to experience abnormal blood pressure levels.

What Sugar Does to Your Blood Pressure

Sweetener increases insulin levels, which then leads to an increased heart rate and elevated blood pressure. Research shows if one fourth of your daily calorie consumption is made up of sugar, your risk of death by cardiovascular disease triples.

 

What to Watch Out For when it Comes to Sugar

It’s not the natural sugars you should be as concerned with, it’s the processed sugar found in processed foods and drinks.

Processed sugar has been broken down and re-engineered from its natural state to take on a different use as both a sweetener and preservative.

The Issue with Sugar

But the food industry doesn’t make eliminating sweetener easy.

There is so much processed food with preservatives that rely on the addition of sugar that a trip to the grocery store can be quite deceiving without most of us even realizing all the added sugar we’re adding to our grocery carts.

The companies that produce processed foods are making money because frozen meals, potato chips, and candy require little effort to prepare and sugar plays a big role in making these products so enticing.

The best thing you can do for your health is follow a whole diet, like the DASH diet.

Any sugar you consume should be in the natural form of fruits, vegetables and fat free dairy products.

Keeping It Sweet And Healthy

It’s hard to cut out syrups and processed table sugar, especially if you love to bake or enjoy coffee and tea on the sweeter side. But with a little effort and a few changes in your lifestyle, it is possible to significantly reduce the amount of sugar you consume.

Instead of table sugar, use raw honey, palm sugar, stevia or fruit juice to sweeten your foods and beverages.

Less Sugar and Blood Pressure

Making a decision to consume less sugar is much easier than following through with that decision. If you’re not reading labels and selecting products based on the content, your sugar intake may be much higher than you realize.

Take the time to read labels on products before making a purchase. Foods with long lists of ingredients are likely packed with added sugar as well as added sodium.

Isn’t always labeled simple sugar on labels, also look for: brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, fruit juice concentrates, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, invert sugar, malt sugar, molasses, raw sugar, syrup or molecules ending with “ose” (dextrose, fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, sucrose).

 

What is a Safe Amount of Sugar?

Consumption should be based on your own individual lifestyle as some can eat sugar with less affect while others may need to avoid it as much as possible.

The American Heart Association recommends the following as the maximum amount of sugar you consume:

Men: 150 calories per day (37.5 grams or 9 teaspoons)
Women: 100 calories per day (25 grams or 6 teaspoons)

Sources of Highest Amount of Added Sugar

Major sources of added sugar include soft drinks, candy, cakes, cookies, processed foods, fruit drinks, dairy desserts including ice cream and many grain products.

Heart.org with a list of some common foods with added sugars.